Illicit drug trafficking: a South African report on the extent of the global trading

Keywords: Drugs trafficking, Narcotics, illicit, organized crime, global, crime, police, syndicate, mafia, drug lords

Abstract

The objects of this research are: First, to explore some of the issues relating to drug trafficking in South Africa. Second, to highlight the devasting consequences of drug abuse on citizens, our brothers, and sisters whose lives have been destroyed and cut short. Third, to explore, government policies, police efforts, and citizens to combat the social menace of illicit drug trafficking plaguing us.

The researcher investigated the following problems: drug trafficking and its impact on individuals or citizens and society, barriers faced by law enforcement to stop the illicit borderless organized crime.

The main results of the research are: first, drug trafficking is a lucrative global phenomenon that is very difficult to stop over the years. Second, is the identification of varieties of drugs found in South African markets, their origins, transit, and final destinations. Third, reporting the extent of drug seizures in South Africa explains why the trade has continued unabated over the years. Fourth, highlights the need for a collective and suggestive way to consign drug trafficking to history.

The area of practical use of the research is for all citizens, law enforcement officers affected by the illicit trade, communities, countries, research students, social workers, and staff members of social welfare and criminal justice departments

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Author Biography

Shaka Yesufu, University of Limpopo

Department of Research and Development

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Published
2022-06-30
How to Cite
Yesufu, S. (2022). Illicit drug trafficking: a South African report on the extent of the global trading. ScienceRise, (3), 38-47. https://doi.org/10.21303/2313-8416.2022.002552
Section
Social communications in the society development